Amazon Mechanical Turk is a service that lets you make money online through doing paid microtasks. Each task is something simple that requires human interaction like rating search results, checking for the right spelling on search terms, categorizing the tone of an article, or even basic translating. You can do these tasks from anywhere you want and make money online from the world’s largest e-retailer.
This is an outstanding article and it’s certainly generous of Yaro to share this type of first hand experience. I believe the key to any successful online business is to ultimately keep your overhead expenses extremely low. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to accomplish that with an online business like doing your own marketing, only paying for B2B services if absolutely necessary, etc. For example, most businesses, even if they are purely internet based, often benefit from having a fax number and using an email fax service compared with traditional fax is definitely an easy way to save money. Even though most people consider faxes to be a thing of the past, most would be surprised how often faxes are still used and using an online fax service that delivers faxes straight to your email is a great way to save time.
The downside with this model is that you are still trading hours for dollars, which is a violation of my holy trinity concept. It’s not necessarily the worst option – and many people enjoy the life of a high-paid consultant very much – but it does have the inherent limitation that a service is not replicable unless you personally do it yourself or hire people to do it for you, both activities that take time and/or resources.
Become a proofreader. All kinds of businesses hire professional proofreaders to look over their copy and content for errors before they publish. This side hustle is one that could work for nearly anyone since you can work from home provided you have a computer and an internet connection. You can find online proofreading jobs through websites like Indeed.com and FlexJobs.com

What’s the catch? None, really. Cash back apps act as affiliates for many online merchants, which means that whenever you make a purchase through one of the apps, they get a small commission — but then, they give you a portion of that commission as “cash back”. For example, if I buy a pair of Nike shoes through the Ebates app (or website) and spend $75, Ebates may get a $10 commission but then they’ll pass $7 back to me. It’s basically a way to get sale prices on stuff that isn’t on sale!
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