Also, some of them are deceptively simple. For instance, let’s say you spend 40 hours this month learning keyword research and posting 30 how to articles on eHow. And you make $20. You may think, “Wow, fifty cents an hour. What a waste of my time.” Except, next month, after the articles settle higher in Google, you make $40. A year from now, having done nothing else, you are making $100-$150/month. And assuming Google doesn’t change their rules, you should continue receiving checks for years with no additional work.
5. Fiverr – Fiverr is a great place to make a few bucks or spend a few bucks if you need some of the services people offer. Basically, everything is $5. You either pay $5 or charge $5. They call them “gigs.” You can offer your services however you choose. If you sell art and you’re fine selling pieces for $5 each, that’s a gig. If you’re a graphic designer and you want to offer your services for $10/hour, simply offer a 30 minute gig. If they need two hours of graphic design, they pay you $20, or $10/hour by buying four gigs.

What’s the catch? None, really. Cash back apps act as affiliates for many online merchants, which means that whenever you make a purchase through one of the apps, they get a small commission — but then, they give you a portion of that commission as “cash back”. For example, if I buy a pair of Nike shoes through the Ebates app (or website) and spend $75, Ebates may get a $10 commission but then they’ll pass $7 back to me. It’s basically a way to get sale prices on stuff that isn’t on sale!

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