Read product reviews before you buy. Decide whether a desktop or a laptop is best to suit your needs (Ex. You will likely need a desktop to get a customer service position. On the other end of the spectrum, proofreading can be done on a tablet if necessary.) And, while you’re budgeting for new hardware, don’t forget to factor in a good headset – many remote jobs require them. (To increase your marketability, you can also add a decent mic and an all-in-one printer. Or even a foot pedal if you’re going into transcription.)


If I have a blog that is getting 100,000 page views a month that means that I’m probably getting at least 50,000 people to the site (most blogs will do between 1.2 to 1.4 pages per session). That means I have to try and get some small percentage of those people to buy something from me if I really want to do well. If I can’t get them to buy something then (in some cases) I have ads running on the site that will make me money anyways.
CNBC calls Acorns “the new millennial investing strategy.” Once you connect the app to a debit or credit card, it rounds up your purchases to the nearest dollar and funnels your digital change into an investment account. With the app, you’ll start small and stack up change over time with the Acorns “round-up” feature. That means if you spend $15.25 on your connected debit or credit card, for example,  75 cents gets dropped into your Acorns account and gets invested.
It’s something akin to picking stocks. You want to buy undervalued domains, and sell them later on at a higher price. For example, you can pick a domain that is out of favor, but could be related to some future event. So if you decide that the stock market is likely to crash in the future, you can buy a domain that includes the words stock market crash during a rising market, and then sell it in a falling market.
Once you have that problem or need nailed, the next step is to validate that idea and make sure you’ve actually got customers who will pay for it. This means building a minimum viable product, getting objective feedback from real customers, incorporating updates, testing the market for demand, and getting pricing feedback to ensure there’s enough of a margin between your costs and what consumers are willing to pay.
Enjoy making silly videos? Even short, silly videos can sell products online. Find an product worth promoting that has an affiliate program, then target your video toward potential customers of that product. In your video summary on YouTube, place your affiliate link for the product, and after the video, do a 30-second still frame showing a short URL where people can buy the product. If your video is funny, informative, or useful, you may sell some products. Big tip: Try to promote a product that makes you a fair amount of money for each sale, but doesn’t cost a whole lot for the potential customer. You can find products on Commission Junction, for one.

If you are looking into the steady paycheck of customer service, this is a typical requirements list. Each company is different, so please refer to the individual listing for that company's requirements. *A desktop or laptop less than 3 years old*Minimum speed is 2GHz of processing *Windows operating system, usually Windows 7 or 8. The exception would be Mac-specific positions like Apple At-Home Advisors. *20 GB free hard disk space*2 GB of RAM (some companies require up to 8 GB RAM)*sound and video card*DSL, Fiber Optic or Cable internet
Thanks for the great post. I couldn’t agree the more with you that a lot of times people end up having to spend more time to struggle with their online business rather having quality time with their family and etc. I think you hit the nail when you mentioned that one of your goals is to ensure you adopt an approach and system that allows you to not getting stuck in the trade hour for money kind of thing.

The first follows the startup path we outlined above: You have a disruptive idea for an app or piece of software, you validate the idea with real customers, and then raise money to hire developers or a development studio to build, launch, and scale your software. If you’ve done everything right, your software will be accepted to the Apple and Google Stores and you’ll make money every time someone downloads it or pays for a premium feature.

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